Education

Offline Source Sheet

In this conversation, we focus on how to “know” others. This will help students stop and see others in the world for you they are, not for whom we assume they are, understand that relationships can change the world. Attribution: Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt
In this conversation, we look more closely at concepts of the stranger. What does it mean to live in a world where there are “strangers”? Why are there strangers? We explore “otherness” from the perspective of the stranger, looking at who the stranger is, what assumptions we make about strangers, and how we might change those ideas. Attribution: Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt
This conversation provides two texts that explore these ideas: How do we understand our own identity in the context of a pluralistic world? How do we interact with others who are different than us? How do we explain who we are and why we choose to celebrate our identity? Attribution: Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt
This lesson plan, excerpted from the Keshet Hineini Curriculum Resource Guide, is a great way to open the conversation about how Jewish thought and practice about a variety of issues has evolved over time. Aimed at 6-12 graders, the lesson encourages students to name all the things that have changed in Jewish law since the time of Moses and Torah. Quotes from the documentary film Hineini: Coming Out in a Jewish High School and Jewish law texts are examined and discussed. Students can be asked to consider how attitudes and practices regarding the inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Jews figures into a broader discussion of changes in Jewish law and practice.
A 60 minute lesson plan for 14 - 16 year olds on the different actions they can take to make a positive change in the world.
A discussion and learning activity on the topic of our responsibility as Jews to the broader world.
This lesson extracted from Keshet's Hineini Curriculum Resource Guide asks students to study the evolution the Jewish legal status of the heresh - deaf-mute and the deaf person from Torah to Modernity. After engaged in text study students are asked to consider whether the evolution and understanding of the status of gay and lesbian Jews is comparable.
During Pesach, we celebrate our freedom from slavery in Egypt. In this pack, there are resources and activities on children's rights and slavery.
During Pesach, we celebrate our freedom from slavery in Egypt. In this pack, there are resources and activities on children's rights and slavery. Note that this pack does NOT include the p38-39 cartoons.
The 4 questions in the Pesach Seder highlight the importance of allowing children to learn and be educated. This pack contains resources and activities on Pesach, the 4 questions and the child's right to education.
Syndicate content