Conflict & Emergency

Dvar Torah

AJWS's weekly Torah commentary explores themes of social justice that emerge from the parshah. Visit http://tinyurl.com/dvartzedek to sign up to receive the weekly Dvar Tzedek by e-mail.
AJWS's weekly Torah commentary explores themes of social justice that emerge from the parshah. Visit http://tinyurl.com/dvartzedek to sign up to receive the weekly Dvar Tzedek by e-mail.
AJWS's weekly Torah commentary explores themes of social justice that emerge from the parshah. Visit http://tinyurl.com/dvartzedek to sign up to receive the weekly Dvar Tzedek by e-mail.
AJWS's weekly Torah commentary explores themes of social justice that emerge from the parshah. Visit http://tinyurl.com/dvartzedek to sign up to receive the weekly Dvar Tzedek by e-mail.
About the meaning of Hanukah and its message of response to the world in the aftermath of Natural Disasters. This is part of the on-gong series of Divrei Torah being published on the NECHAMA, Jewish Response to Disaster web site and subsequently sent to our e-mail community.
There is a midrash, a Rabbinic commentary, about the first winter that Adam and Eve experienced after the Garden of Eden. This ancient tale was a portent of the lights of Hanukkah, a holiday in which we traditionally light candles during the darkest point of winter.
The seven-week period between Passover and the holiday of Shavuot (which begins the evening of June 7) is called sefirat ha-omer, the “counting of the omer.” I have been overwhelmed during this time of counting by the number of tragic storm reports being received from across the country. May the counting of the days for those affected by this spring’s disasters be as short as possible and may God grant the victims the strength and fortitude to speedily recover.
In 2011, Parashat shelach fell on refugee week. Here are a few questions from parashat shelach that relate to refugees.
As a former disaster manager turned rabbinical student, I have been thinking much about March’s catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the role of God in disasters.
At Purim, Esther is made to "be prepared" to respond to a pending disaster in her community. Her message is enduring - that being prepared transcends to all potential calamities - including, of course, natural disasters.
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