Migration

Offline Source Sheet

Immigration in Torah sources - Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz

Source Sheet

This source sheet will be used in a variety of settings (Jewish, interfaith, and secular) to demonstrate the deep roots of immigrant justice in Jewish text and thought.
The right of movement and equal treatment of immigrants.
Immigration is controversial in many countries, for the question is should we grant immigrants the same rights as citizens? Is it injustice to treat them any differently? As Jews, we have been immigrants in many places around the world and it is our duty to treat others, including immigrants, with fairness.
Immigration is controversial in many countries, for the question is should we grant immigrants the same rights as citizens? Is it injustice to treat them any differently? As Jews, we have been immigrants in many places around the world and it is our duty to treat others, including immigrants, as equals.
Immigration is controversial in many countries, for the question is should we grant immigrants the same rights as citizens? Is it injustice to treat them any differently? As Jews, we have been immigrants in many places around the world and it is our duty to treat others, including immigrants, as equals.
This source sheet will be used in a variety of settings (Jewish, interfaith, and secular) to demonstrate the deep roots of immigrant justice in Jewish text and thought.
For small group of 11th graders
From the Sources is designed by AJWS to facilitate holiday text study around issues of social justice. We invite you to engage in the texts and use them in your community to teach and take action.

Text

right to left

You shall not abhor an Edomite, for he is your kinsman. You shall not abhor an Egyptian, for you were a stranger in her land.
[JPS translation. Edited for gender neutrality]

לֹא תְתַעֵב אֲדֹמִי כִּי אָחִיךָ הוּא, לֹא תְתַעֵב מִצְרִי כִּי גֵר הָיִיתָ בְאַרְצוֹ:

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