Civil/Human Rights

Dvar Torah

Our Jewish values compel us to address the mistreatment of LGBT youth.
I recently took part in the Torah L'Am course, run at JHub and facilitated by Maureen Kendler from the London School of Jewish Studies. As part of the course, I was tasked with creating a Dvar Torah on the text in Shemot (Exodus) where we first meet Moshe and witness his physical and emotional development.
Talya Gillman delivered this d'var to Congregation Beth Shalom (Seattle) on Yom Kippur 2011. It seeks to amplify the message of Isaiah's Haftorah, which asks us to turn our ritualistic fast into action by fighting injustice, cruelty and selfishness in the world. The d'var calls on us to consciously dedicate ourselves to empathy and "activated" compassion.
My "boomer" generation addressed many social issues. And we also left new issues for the next generation to solve.
This Dvar Torah highlights the important connection between names in the book of Shmot and the value of human dignity for all people.
Talya Gillman gave this d'var to the University of Washington Hillel on Rosh Hashana 2010. In recounting a near-death experience, Talya calls on us to make the upcoming year truly meaningful, by not only asking God for a world deplete of indifference and poverty, but by working towards the creation of that reality ourselves.
In 2011, Parashat shelach fell on refugee week. Here are a few questions from parashat shelach that relate to refugees.
How the story of Yehuda and Tamar can relate to the modern world.
American Jewish World service publishes divrei Torah for each major Jewish holiday, which explore themes of social justice that emerge from that holiday. Visit http://tinyurl.com/chagvchesed to sign up to receive this publication by e-mail.
American Jewish World service publishes divrei Torah for each major Jewish holiday, which explore themes of social justice that emerge from that holiday. Visit http://tinyurl.com/chagvchesed to sign up to receive this publication by e-mail.
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